Hannah James: The Outline Seems Indelible

Hannah James
The Outline Seems Indelible
Plymouth College of Art Gallery
(http://www.plymouthart.ac.uk/gallery#.UZqlnUpKafU)
04/02/2013

Hannah James’ ‘The Outline seems Indelible’ is a mixed media exhibition that is hard to understand at first. What could possibly link printed shapes on the wall, and small slide show projector in the corner? Information was clearly provided at the entrance and with explanation from the artist herself, ‘The Outline seems Indelible’ became an engaging and thought-provoking exhibition to view.

Highly experimental and explorative in nature, this exhibition is clearly the work of a relatively new artist, filled with fresh ideas and curiosity. This is the first time that James has worked with audio recordings, which added texture and ambience to the gallery space.

The exhibition deals with themes of multi-authorship and censorship, with the gaze of the artist clearly implied as well as the gaze of others.

The breadth of sources James has used in this exhibition is admirable, with sources from literature, and found objects from a secondary school which the artist worked at for a brief period of time. A mixed-media approach gives this exhibition a broad audience appeal with a specialism to suit most viewers, making it an ‘easy-to-access’ and also exciting viewing experience with a different artistic discipline at each turn.

The exhibition used the space well, and there was particular consideration to the positioning of the audio devices; one placed by the windows, so that a viewers attention would fade in and out of the recording. An element of sculpture (a medium which James previously worked mostly in) was implored with a large table placed in the centre of the room displaying twice exposed photography, showing that James was an artist eager to expand and explore new mediums, whilst still maintaining her artistic roots.

Fig 1. Close up on Hannah James’ table work

Overall Hannah James produced and exciting and engaging exhibition, which worked well with the gallery space and challenged viewers to consider ideas of censorship and multi-authorship through a mixture of different media choices.

References:
Information from Artist Lecture

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